Late 1800's English Dough Box (z4309a)

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Late 1800's English Dough Box (z4309a)

327.00

A very old English dough box, recently stripped to the bare wood with lots of character and charm.

Dough boxes were used to warm the flour in winter if it had come in from a cold barn or cellar. Once the yeast was added the mixture had to stay quite warm for the dough to rise into a nice “sponge”, which would make light bread. You could knead the dough thoroughly in a box-shaped trough without spilling much flour.

The box’s position (near the fire) was important. The lid was good for keeping in the warmth, and it protected the dough from mice, ash, or other horrors: especially useful if the dough was left to rise a long time. Overnight was not unusual. Slow rising generally improved flavour and texture.

The lid offered a surface for shaping the risen dough into loaves and then leaving them to rise again after being handled. A lidded box could be used for storing bread.

Wooden dough boxes are still used today - mainly by Pizzerias. The wood is the best material for taking the moisture out of the dough.

This charming little box would make a lovely linen or blanket box, or as a general storage box.

Height 16.5", width 41", depth 17.5"

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